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News/Business. (2013) Breaking and in-depth news coverage from America and around the world and the latest in sports and weather. New. (CC) (Stereo)

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03:01:00

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San Francisco, CA, USA

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mpeg2video

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704

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480

TOPIC FREQUENCY

Pakistan 53, U.s. 50, Afghanistan 20, Mohamed Morsi 18, America 17, Texas 14, Egypt 14, United States 13, Nato 12, Los Angeles 12, Us 12, Cairo 12, Mexico 11, Morsi 11, Thailand 9, Tehran 8, Syria 8, Taliban 8, Jazeera America 8, Obama 7,
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  Al Jazeera America    News    News/Business.  (2013) Breaking and in-depth news coverage  
   from America and around the world and the latest in sports...  

    November 4, 2013
    6:00 - 9:00am EST  

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♪ protests across egypt today as the country's first demeanorly elected president is on trial accused of violence and murder and if convicted mohamed morsi could face the death penalty and fall out after a suspected u.s. drone strike kills the head of the pakistan taliban and the u.s. ambassador is going to islamabad. the trouble gunman accused of opening fire at lax and killing a tsa worker and they told him after they shot him he acted alone. and a traditional form of fighting hundreds of years old is in danger of getting knocked
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out by modern martial arts. good morning and welcome to al jazeera america, i'm stephanie, more than four months after egypt military coup the trial of the first freely elected president is underway and p.m. was over thrown on july 3 and held in a secret location until today. no pictures showing morsi in court have come out. he arrived earlier at a police academy in cairo for the start of his trial. these are live pictures of protesters outside the court building. morsi is charged with insightment to commit murder. supporters say the trial is political and claim it's part of the military crack down on the muslim brotherhood. 14 more brotherhood leaders are also going on trial today. john kerry visited on sunday and urged the military government to
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work toward restoring democracy and egypt is planning to hold a national referendum on an amended constitution. presidential and parliamentary elections are planned next year. >> obviously part of the roadmap and part of the process of strengthening egypt's linkages to the rest of the world will be measured in the way in which the people of egypt are sustained in their ability to have the right to assemble, the right to express themselves, but even as they do that we also agree no one should be allowed to practice violence with impunity. >> reporter: right now more than 20,000 police and soldiers are deployed across cairo to prevent violence and al jazeera dominick cain has more on the trial. >> reporter: these are the first pictures of mohamed morsi
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to emerge since he was deposed as president in july. >> translator: leaked by an egyptian newspaper they show him during a meeting with foreign dignitaries later that month and he said he was ousted by the military if a move that was illegal. it's illegal crime, i'm the president according to the constitutional of the country. and the strike against the state institutions, this issue relates all the basics of these institutions and the definition of an institution. >> reporter: the contrast with his inauguration is stark. it was a moment that seemed to suggest egypt's transition from dictator ship to democracy, the arrival of a freely elected president both in a traditional government setting and then more emotionally in the square. the crucible of the revolution itself but 18 months later
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mohamed morsi is out of office and charges of insighting others to commit murder. the prosecution case relates to violence of his supporters and opponents last december outside of the presidential palace. one lawyer who will be in court to observe him told al jazeera the charges are baseless. >> translator: there is no evidence that dr. morsi has committed any crime. trials of a political nature and atmosphere of a coup usually and i hope they are wrong they are never neutral, transparent or fair. >> reporter: 20,000 members of the security forces will be on the streets with metal detectors to prevent protesters disrupting the trial. the anti-coup alliance called on supporters to stage mass demonstrations in protest. on the streets of the capitol opinion is divided before the trial. >> translator: i believe it's a
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good thing because morsi was bad in one year as what happened in the past 30 years and should be tried. he did not fulfill promises and during his time there was no security. >> translator: people will start taking to the streets again. >> reporter: mohamed morsi's family has been able to speak to him only once since he was detained. they will not be in court since like him they reject the court's right to try him. dominick cain, al jazeera, cairo. >> reporter: and initial reports saying morsi's trial is not going smoothly and state tv in egypt says other defendants in the courtroom are chanting against his prosecution and sue says that morsi is refusing to cooperate. >> he said he was the legitimate president and the coup was on the judge. and clearly he is not respecting
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the judge and the due process of the court and not respecting the fact he is there and begs the question how he will defend the question if he will not embrace the fact he is on trial and no getting away from that. if he sits there and says nothing he will be tried anyway. he is standing along with the other muslim brotherhood defendants and there is 7 alongside of him even though another 14 are also being tried, some of his muslim brotherhood officials. but they apparently we are hearing earlier started chanting in the court to try and disrupt the proceedings as well and doing everything they can to not allow the court case to carry on. but you really have to question as to whether that will be a tactic that can last throughout the whole day. >> and we are reporting from cairo. if morsi is convicted he could face life in prison or the death penalty.
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john kerry is in saudi arabia today and the second stop of his 11-day fence mending mission in the middle east and will discuss syria and the nuclear program with the prime minister. kerry says saudi arabia and u.s. want a transitional government in syria that does not include bashir al-assad. demonstrators gathered outside the former u.s. embassy in tehran for death to america rally. 34 years ago students over ran the embassy taking u.s. workers hostage and happen every november but this is the largest turnout in years and the revolutionary guard are calling for a major showing and comes as the president ruhani has been
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making overtures with support of the leader. pakistan says it will review it's relationship with the u.s. after a deadly drone strike and he was killed friday near the afghan border and the local government wants to block nato supply routes to afghanistan and we report the taliban want revenge. >> he says he shouldn't have come to work today but says he can't afford to stay home. he tells us he fears attacks by the pakistan taliban after the u.s. killed the leader in an unmanned aerial drone strike. >> translator: people stopped coming to market. we are so afraid the taliban will attack us, i don't know what to do. >> reporter: his fears are based on personal experience. the story teller's market where he works has been attacked several times by the taliban and
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lost month his uncle was killed in a bombing. and security is on high alert after the pakistan taliban threatened to afenge the death saying the blood will be turned into a suicide bomber. besides the fear there is also anger. in a media briefing on saturday interior minister kahn said they destroyed the efforts. >> it was ambushed and not acquired, it was an ambush and we see it as an ambush. >> reporter: other political parties want more than angry words with washington. and khan controls the northern providence that borders the strongholds in the tribal areas and demanding nato supply routes to afghanistan be closed.
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>> translator: i will raise the issue on monday in the national assembly, nato supply lines should be blocked until drone attacks stop. we will not allow nato supply lines to come until they stop the drone attacks. >> reporter: many people in the pakistan government, military and intelligence agencies are pleased with his death. during his time as leader he was responsible for carrying out several major attacks claiming thousands of lives. but he was also open to peace talks with the government and now that is under threat as the pakistan taliban threatens to avenge his death, al jazeera, islamabad. >> reporter: and u.s. lawmaker is defending that drone strike, chairman said it will protect american troops. >> this is the guy that is trying to create the problems for pakistan and relates with afghanistan taliban, these are
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the folks that cut and closed 500 schools and most girl schools in the eastern providence of afghanistan and part of the network which is basically a giant organized crime group operating in the areas of pakistan involved in supporting al-qaeda, taliban and others. this was a bad guy. by the way, there is some information recently that concerned us about the safety of our troops. i feel a little better for our troops today than i did before this event happened. >> reporter: and this group claimed responsibility for the failed attempt to bomb time square three years ago. former president of pakistan has been granted bail. he is charged in the killing of a person in a raid six years ago at islamabad mosque and this dragged on and we will go to
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islamabad and good morning to you. this is a symbol of the past , s he a distraction to the courts? >> it's a very good way of putting it and could explain what happened next of musharraf after granting bail in the fourth case he is involved with. he casts a shadow over pakistan but the shadow diminished since earlier this year. he came back to in his own words to save pakistan but really since then he has been struggling to save himself. in fact, he is under house arrest for more than six months, confined to two small rooms in the luxury farm house outside of islamabad and put there for security and didn't think there was a jail safe for him to stay. the fact he doesn't carry the same sort of clout in this
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country that he once used to, i think is perhaps why we may see musharraf actually leave the country eventually. the court has not restricted travels but he is on an interior ministry which means without the government's approval he can't leave the country and the government led with a nasty history and he wants to see the back of him because he is a distraction from the other major problems this country is facing >> he has been under house arrest as i understand it in a villa outside pakistan, how much of a hardship is that for mr. musharraf? >> look, this was once the most powerful man in pakistan, a country of 180 million people. he ruled this country effectively with an iran fist for nearly nine years. he came back to pakistan because he thought that the people of
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pakistan wanted him to come back, but the country had changed in the five years he was gone. he was no longer relevant. so when he was placed under house arrest it was stunning to see, never in a country like pakistan which is ruled by the military for more than half of its history ever seen such a senior leader, military leader be put behind bars and dragged through the courts and we have seen a change in psyche in pakistan showing that although the powerful military types have control to the day, they are not completely immune from the law but as we have been saying there is a reasonable chance that the government will find a way for musharraf to leave the country and the military here is very strong and certainly do not want him to be convicted of any crime. >> reporter: fascinating development in pakistan and mts in islamabad and thank you. heavy rain and high winds are hitting mexico's pacific coast
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and sonia may landfall and they lifted severe weather warnings as it came along the shore of el-dorado and could have flash flooding and 6-10" of rain and it will lose steam this afternoon moving inland and over mexico's mountains. it seems like mexico has been slammed by storm after storm this season and we have a look at what is behind the severe weather, good morning. >> as a matter of fact, it's been quiet across the atlanta base and active in the pacific and portions of the gulf of mexico earlier on in the season and back in september, two tropical storm emanuel and ingrid went to mexico and triggered land slides and killed hundreds of people. we will look at sonia diminish rapidly making its way across the mountains.
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luckily the storm was weak when it did make landfall packing winds at one point of 45 miles per hour but luckily it's running into mountains and terrain and the winds diminished to about 35 miles per hour. a bit stationary now but it will have an impact on texas. a lot of moisture will push into texas and produce locally heavy rainfall. as i said sonya is characterized as a remnant low but the moisture will travel across the mountains of mexico, into texas and produce 2-4" of rain, 4-6" of rain locally. so if you are in houston you will see showers. careful on i-35 in addition to that and be careful for flash flooding and they have issued flood warnings across eastern texas, along the coast as well. if you are traveling along i-35, i-10 take it easy, it's a slow go. i will tell you about the major cool down impacting much of the
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country and back to you stephanie. >> reporter: colorado voters must decide tuesday on a sweeping education overhall and are being asked to pass $1 billion tax increase to boost school funding and the idea is controversial and it's strict. raise per pupil spending hurt by falling revenues. president obama was on the campaign trial not for himself but a fellow democratic and terry is running for governor in virginia and he shared the stage saturday in arlington and he tried to link the opponent to the government shut down. >> we have seen an extreme faction of the republican party that is shown again and again and again that they are willing to hijack the entire party and the country and the economy and grant progress to an absolute
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halt if they don't get 100% of what they want. >> reporter: he is leading in the polls, there is a governor race in new jersey where they will decide to reelect chris christie. romney is slamming president obama over the affordable care act and on nbc he is unhappy with the similar law that romney signed when he was governor of massachusetts. >> in massachusetts we phased in the requirements so that there was a slow roll out, that way you could test the systems as you went along to make sure there wouldn't be glitches and the most important lesson the president failed to learn was you have to tell the american people the truth. and when he told the american people that you could keep your health insurance if you wanted to keep that plan, period, he said that time and again. >> right. >> he wasn't telling the truth. >> reporter: romney said the economy stalled and u.s. lost international credibility since the president was e elected.
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the senate will take up antidiscrimination bill today to ban workplace discrimination against gays and transgender people and delves say they are fairly confident of the outcome but the bill needs backing from republicans and passage would mean vibingry for lgbt community and to bring the issue to the floor in 1996 failed. there are millions of orphan children around the world, how one group is using faith to help them find good homes. with a murder rate 6 times higher than the lower 48 are drug wars changing face of puerto rico and the troubled island. and boxing dates back centuries but fear the fighting form is overwhelmed by the cousin market arts and this is a live picture outside of the courthouse where
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mohamed morsi the ousted president is on trial and the judge adjourned the case until january the 8th. we will be right back.
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♪ good morning and welcome back to al jazeera america, i'm stephanie and in a few minutes we will examine a nationwide effort to find homes for every orphan in the country but first let's look at what temperatures we will see across the nation today and metrologist is here. >> good morning stephanie it's a cold start to the day in the northeast and temperatures the dropping quite a bit because of the frontal boundary and pushed off shore but we have another one on the way and check out temperatures right now and we are 36 and albany and 40 and we will stay in the 40s in much of the northeast and that is about 15-20 temperature difference from where we were friday into saturday, stephanie back to you. >> fracking in the u.s. may not
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produce as much oil as expected and the practice brought a surge in oil and gas production by tapping sweet spots under ground but the boom could end soon and they say u.s. reserves could run low as soon as 2016. that would be four years sooner than the government's expected peek of out put and they relied on sweet spots that may not last long. here is what is making news in the financial markets and business world, stock futures are higher at this hour and signal a start when trading gets underway. there are reports out this week and they will keep a close on on it and we will have a report on gross domestic and that is out on thursday and sluggish growth in the quarter and employment numbers and see if there was increase in wages and salaries for american workers. all these numbers are important
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to the federal reserve as it debates when it should begin pulling back from the stimulus. water street is enjoying the money policy and pushes stocked to record highs recently. this is this morning and dow is 15,615 and s&p 1761 and nasdaq 3,022 and stocks are higher and waiting to hear what the central bank will do. asia barely moved and hong kong in the red and shanghai was up. and twitter makes the debut on the new york stock exchange happening thursday and wall street is buzzing and they are skeptical and a poll says 47% of americans do not think buying twitter shares is a good investment. a plea bargain is near against the hedge fund and federal
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prosecutors will manhattan will talk about an insider deal and they will agree to pay more than $1 billion in criminal penalties and the penalty is the largest ever for an insider trading case. sac plead guilty to insider trading and the company is one of the most profitable hedge funds on wall street for two decades and previously denied it encouraged or permitted insider trading. more than 150 million worldwide have lost one or both of their parents. many live in orphanages or the streets without caregivers, food, education or healthcare. educators say children who spend three months in orphanages lose a month of developmental skills and the past five years the christian alliance has orphan sunday, a national event that encourages christians to adopt or support needy children. and it drew thousands on sunday to churches across the country
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and we visited a church that took part. >> and she attending weekly service at her church life for life in florida. and she shared her personal journey of adopting two children living in brazil. now as the coordinator of orphan ministries for the church she encourages others to do the same. >> we got thinking what might have happened with the other kids that don't have the same situation as our children that are adopted now. >> reporter: as many as 145 million children around the world have lost both their parents. >> we bring awareness also for everybody that they need to be adopted, not only to be helped but actually the main help we can do is to adopt them. >> reporter: her church also assists with foster children in florida, supporting a home for
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froster kids called his house. >> it's to raise funds for kids house and other orphanages to help them, you know, bring that awareness, bring that love, bring what they need so we can provide what god has given us. >> reporter: churches in more than 30 states and over 50 nations celebrated orphan sunday this year, some critics accuse this movement of ignoring adoption related issues like child trafficking and child exploitation and a statement from the international organization christian alliance for orphans says they miss the broader point, without the protection of caring families children face huge risk of sex trafficking, famine and poverty and other things. and they don't dispute the allegations but says her organization has a thorough adoption vetting process.
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>> it's a sad story to be told if those facts are there and i'm sure they are but it's not a history about his house and we try to protect them. >> reporter: the spokeswoman added that in the 25 years of ministry they have never had a single parent accused of abuse. in miami al jazeera. >> a study by the donald son adoption institute warns on on line groups that offer children for adoption. bringing people together may be driving them further apart after violence erupts at polling places across the country plus a deadly drug war is ripping puerto rico apart and they are moving into areas once considered safe. in a new york city marathon runners get another chance to cross the finish line one year after hurricane sandy cancelled
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the race. >> we will go into what happened to kubiak last night later in sports. ♪ recommend that you block that person. >> i don't want to minimise this, because i mean, there's some really horrible things that are on line, and it's not - it's not just twitter, what has
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happened through social media and the anonymity of the net is that you see websites, hate-filled websites targetting all sorts of groups, popping up. there has been a huge number of those that exist as well. >> al jazeera america is a straight-forward news channel. >> its the most exciting thing to happen to american journalism in decades. >> we believe in digging deep. >> its unbiased, fact-based, in-depth journalism. >> you give them the facts, dispense with the fluff and get straight to the point. >> i'm on the ground every day finding stories that matter to you. >> in new orleans... >> seattle bureau... >> washington... >> detroit... >> chicago... >> nashville... >> los angeles... >> san francisco... >> al jazeera america, take a new look at news. on inside story, we bring together unexpected voices closest to the story, invite hard-hitting debate and desenting views and always
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explore issues relevant to you. ♪ welcome back, i'm stephanie and these are the top stories at this hour. after spending hours in a cairo courtroom the trial of ousted president mohamed morsi wrapped up for the day and not in session until the new year, morsi and 14 officials of the muslim brotherhood are charged with murder against political opponents and pakistan will review the relationship with u.s. after a drone strike killed the leader of the pakistan taliban. parties in the country want to stop nato supplies to afghanistan because of the strikes. the man accused in the shooting in the la airport told police he
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acted alone. as the f.b.i. looks for a motive details remerging of the suspect and described those who know him as a loaner and we report. >> a photographer snapped this picture of terrified passengers hiding in a stall at la international airport while a gunman opened fire. the suspected shooter, 23-year-old paul ciancia targeted workers at the arport and the first victim hernandez shot repeatedly at point blank range. >> he killed multiple tsa employees. >> reporter: and he shot tsa officer james spear and tony grigsby recovering and the fourth was hit in the leg. moments before the attack police say ciancia's friend dropped him off at the airport unaware of
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his plan and a complaint filed in federal court said he had a duffel bag with a rifle and at least five magazines full of ammo and a letter addressing tsa directly and former classmates are stunned remembering him as a loaner. >> he was shy and kept to himself and walking around by himself, didn't really talk to anybody at all. >> i'm absolutely shocked. >> reporter: his former roommate points the same picture of the out of work mechanic who moved to la from a small new jersey town. >> i didn't have issues with him or anything, he was nice and a bit alone or introverted but nothing i would ever, ever expect him to do something like this. >> reporter: the police chief in pensville, new jersey is speaking on behalf of the suspect's family. >> we don't know what happened in la and they don't know either
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and they want to turn the stones over and try to find out. we are umly upset, the family. >> reporter: he had no previous record and now it's not clear why he targeted tsa officers but authorities say he was ready to die in the attack. erica with al jazeera. >> reporter: authorities believe he bought his weapons legally in los angeles and he is hospitalized and unresponsive after being shot four times by police. the birmingham airport is now open again at a threat forced a shut down and evacuated two hours on sunday, the officials of the airport called the f.b.i. after finding a threatening note, nothing was found during a search by a bomb squad and flights were diverted or delayed. a math teacher was an educator who loved his students and 45-year-old was a marine and
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sergeant to the nevada international guardian full military honors sunday during a memorial service. he was killed by a 7th grader who wounded two other students before killing himself. fall out from a drone attack is straining the shaky relations between the u.s. and pakistan even more. the leader of the taliban was killed friday in a drone strike and they want revenge. pakistan is reviewing relations with the u.s. while politicians there want to block nato supply routes to afghanistan. let's bring in al jazeera correspondent. good morning to you. pakistan says it's reevaluating ties with the u.s., what is at stake here? >> well, there is a lot at stake because by the end of next year, which is 2014, the u.s. and nato
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allies will have to withdraw from the date they set so they will have to move most of that hardware to pakistan territory and looking for an exit strategy and that of course will need pakistan's help. the opposition in pakistan is now saying you should stop the supplies to afghanistan and not give any exit guarantees until the americans guaranty they will stop the drone strikes. however, it must be understood the relationship with the united states is decades old and despite the ups and downs the relationship is likely to continue no matter what the consequence is for both countries because the americans have also said the strategic partnership with pakistan is extremely important and the political leadership within the country is also divided as far as that relationship with the
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united states is concerned. >> reporter: blocking key supply routes to afghanistan, is that likely to happen or is that more of an empty threat? >> well, as far as the province they are concerned which is where i am right now the government they will be moving to an assembly calling for a blockade of nato supplies through the particular province and that is underway and this is very real and the leader of the pakistan who heads the government in the providence says he doesn't care even if he was to lose his government at the providence. so indeed he is challenging and of course it will be very important to see whether the central government which actually has the domain of foreign policy, whether the central government is on board
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because the prime minister of pakistan is going to be briefed by his cabinet in the next few hours and is going to be some sort of outcome from that particular meeting with the prime minister later tonight. >> we will continue to follow that, and thank you. elections turn violent sunday in parts of kosovo and masked men burst in throwing tear gas and smashing ballot boxes and the police were across the city and the first time they are voting in local elections since they declared independence in 2008. when the storm season calms and dangerous exit begins and 50 people are missing after a boat capsized and eight people were rescued and carrying muslims and they are a muslim minority in myanmar and persecuted and 200 people have been killed in
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violence and hundreds in camps and they tried to flee the country. east of the bay another boat accident killed at least six tourists, a boat capsized and it was over crowded and took on water and sank. the capacity is 150 but there have been more than 200 on board. witnesses say there were not enough life vests. after 20 months of fighting there is hope that the democratic republic of congo could end and has a cease fire and they are discovering mass grave by the border and the fighting is not over yet. >> this patch of bush next to a former m-23 rebel bush looks like any other in eastern congo but something sinister lies
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within. the soldier leads us to the body of a man lying in a shallow grave. he clearly died very recently and the smell is very unpleasant and looks like he was tied up and legs together the moment he died and blood coming from his head and looks like he was executed. and nearby soldiers in villages say there were four more bodies visible in the hole before heavy rain buried them in mud and there were many more throughout the surrounding bush. it's next to a barrix they took and said the m-23 executed its prisoners before it left. we tried to contact m-23 but they have not answered phone calls since government forces fought them back in the last ten days. the people in the villages around the base are living on
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m-23 rule was tough and rebels were often cruel. >> translator: they have prisoners there and heard they killed prisoners and killed them all. >> translator: they would beat people and arrest people and make them disappear. >> reporter: the world's largest u.n. peace keeping forces in congo is helping them fight m-23 and we can't stop it in the 14 years it has been here but say they will find out what happened. >> translator: we all know that bodies have been found in that area. the area has been controlled by m-23 for about one year and that it has been taken by the army just a few days ago. on the u.n. side we quickly form a team which is going to investigate and from the results we are going to tell you what has been discovered. >> reporter: they are investigating two but war crimes are common in the conflicts and
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the full story may never be uncovered, webb in the district of congo. >> reporter: these interest numbers of congo and huge a population of under 68 million people. life expectancy is low. the average life span is only 48 years. it's also a poor country. 87.7% of the population lives below the poverty line. the bodies of two french journalists killed in mali have been repatriated and they were obducted and murdered in saturday in northern mali and bodies found near the town and they were escorted from the mali capitol in a military ceremony and militants linked to al-qaeda and they sent troops to stop the
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rebellion and want to find out who killed the journalists. the murder rate is 6 times higher than in the continental u.s. in the first installment of a three-part series andy gallagher found out what is being done to stop the violence. >> on the outskirts of san-juan say good to a resident and they have been on the corner for years selling lottery tickets and he was shot and killed for the few dollars in his pocket and this is in a neighborhood many consider safe. >> we lost a friend, a good father and really good person that helped everybody. and we are very, very sad that our country. >> reporter: with a murder rate six times out of the congenital united states most people here feel powerless to stop a crime
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wave that permeated every part of the island and they are trying to secure the borders and last year it led to the arrests of more than 300 people but it's simply not enough. bloody crime scenes are common as drug gangs fight for control of a multi-billion dollar cocaine trade and in 2011 they broke the records by logging more than a thousand murders and the rate has fallen since but it remains unacceptably high. he is charged with the task of tackling crime. in a few days hector will step down as police chief but not before expressing disappointment in what he calls institutional failures. >> yes, i do get angry and i let it out sometimes maybe more often than i should but it bothers me that because of inaction, people are being killed here everyday.
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>> reporter: but her man's son heard enough talk and wants his father's death to bring end to an island in big trouble. >> we have to stand up and go to deliver the message because it's the only way. the person don't pay your debt, those crimes are going to continue. it has to stop that. >> reporter: but stopping or even containing the violence here may be the biggest challenge they are yet to face. al jazeera, san-juan. >> reporter: police have neighborhood watch groups in high-crime areas. the mayor of toronto says i'm sorry for appearing in public drunk and wants to stay in office and he said she willing to make changes but did not mention that he abused drugs and they have video showing him
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smoking crack cocaine and he has pressure to step down. and they returned to loud cheers. huge crowds saw a tight race in the new york marathon and two kenyans were in the finish line and the third time they won both the men and women division and they competed with 50,000 runners in the 26.2 mile race and this was more than titles and last year's marathon was cancelled because of super storm sandy. the return of the event was a symbol of recovery. >> i think it certainly is something the community and staton island and brooklyn which are hard hit and have more work to do. >> reporter: it comes in the wake of the boston marathon bombings last spring, three people were killed and more than 260 were injured in that attack. this year in new york security was much tighter.
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there were bag screening and surveillance helicopters and bomb-sniffing dogs. >> extra people out on the courses and bikers and watching people but overall i think it was a really great way to bring everything back together. >> reporter: they spent $1 million on security and john henry is here with sport and i hear there was a serious medical emergency on the field yesterday. >> indeed, we will get to that. the texas are in the middle of a miserable season and the struggles took a back seat and he fell to his knees half time with the colts and emergency personnel put the 52 year old on a stretcher and transported him to a hospital. they put out a statement saying he is in stable condition and did not suffer a heart attack and no word at this time exactly what he did suffer and wade
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phillips coached them in the second half sunday night. the game and they came out gun blazing and i'm referring to the right arm less than a minute in the game 62 yard score and 7-0 and houston just like that. in the first, and johnson at it again, this time it's a 41-yard td strike and they hook up for a third score before half time and 229 receiving yards for johnson. second half johnson show gave away to the colts andrew extravaganza and the hook up was the second td of the second half and colts within five, five minutes later same score, and luck finds hillton from nine yards out and three td as the colts rally and beat them 27-24. eagles and nick foles and
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1234567, yes, 7 touchdowns with 406 yards in the third start of the season and five caught td passes and cooper had three himself and the 7th nfl player to throw them and the other was peyton manning and beat the raiders 41-20. and they helped fuel the chiefs undefeated season this far and not their own but the other team's backup quarterbacks and buffalo did not have the tools to keep smith from picking him off and returning 100 yards and the longest he did this since it happened in 1977. tool was the fourth backup the chiefs faced in five weeks and he serves up the 30st birthday gift who scoops it up and wins 23-13 and 9-0 for the first time since 2003. much has been made about the rise of bullying and harass --
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harassment and the miami dolphins locker room and the tackle jonathan martin is away from the dolphins after some incident in the dolphin's cafeteria. after an internal investigation and representatives of martin they suspended ritchie for unspecified conduct detriment toll the team and he served as the quote ring leader of an on going harassment campaign against martin since drafted in 2012. and tigers have dipped in the past to select a manager and hired brad to replace leyland on the bench and he retired after 8 seasons and did time with the tigers prior to going to the manager's post and 44-year-old is the first and only managerial experience was last year as he had the team israel in the
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classic and that is sports this morning. >> thank you, we have another sport story coming up. a bare knuckle brawl between modern and traditional. a martial arts form is in danger of becoming a thing of the past. ♪
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>> audiences are intelligent
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welcome back to al jazeera america and ahead the century old tradition some fear is being threatened by the rising popularity of mixed martial arts but let's see what potential precipitation we are looking at and good morning. >> a wet day across texas and not saying they don't need the rain but quickly it will come down and we have tropical storm sonia and it will go across the mountains into texas so from san antonio to detroit get ready for the rain not just today but tuesday into wednesday and could see 4-6" of rain locally across
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portions of texas and spread in the midwest also and back to you. >> for centuries we have talked about boxing and the game may be taking it on the chin from a more modern way of fighting. >> reporter: a 500-year-old tradition originally used by soldiers and this is an art of close combat fighting. it's still practiced as kick boxing where each max begins with a traditional dance. and it also serves as one of the three main disciplines that makeup market arts or mma. professional mma is a new sport with a rapidly expanding fan base and pro-mma arrived in bangkok. will it knock out the
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traditional form? >> i don't think mma will take over. i think this is rooted deeply in the culture of thailand but i think mma has a strong presence around the world. >> reporter: global appeal doesn't matter of thailand's governing sports authority and he told al jazeera that professional mma is ban in the country. not true according to the promoter who hosted the first pro-mma fight night in bangkok. >> 2012 there was announcement made by a person from the sport authority of thailand saying that the government of thailand would be banning the sport of mixed martial arts but that never happened. >> reporter: some purist see it as diluting the century old practice other view it as a way to expose a wider audience to the national sport and possibly provide more opportunity for the
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fighters here. and he has been training locals and foreigners for 15 years. >> translator: like brazil where football is the number one sport you bring basketball in and it's only okay to a certain level but not as great as football. but mma might effect the wider industry in that "the boxer"s might want to shift because of the higher prize money in mma. >> reporter: and there are no clearances to the legality of professional mma in thailand, there is no question, the new sport is drawing fighters and their fans to the neon-lit rings, al jazeera in bangkok. >> reporter: and mixed martial arts is gaining popularity and a campaign to make it in the olympics. the end of the first hour, ousted president mohamed morsi trial is adjourned until january and he and others of the muslim
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brotherhood and ciancia spoke to police after he was shot and told officials he acted alone in the deadly attack and pakistan is reviewing resolutions with u.s. after a drone strike that killed the leader of taliban. >> jason smith goes to head coach and find out what his team thinks about his rookie head coach. >> winter is knocking on fall's door and is it here to stay? i'll tell you in just a little while. >> and al jazeera america and we are back with you in 2 1/2 minutes and thomas will be joining me. ♪
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>> thousands of new yorkers are marching in solidarity. >> we're following multiple developments on syria at this hour. >> every hour from reporters stationed around the world and across the country. >> only on al jazeera america.
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what happens when social media uncovers unheard, fascinating news stories? >> they share it on the stream. >> social media isn't an after-thought, it drives discussion across america. >> al jazeera america's social media community, on tv and online. >> this is your outlet for those conversations. >> post, upload and interact. >> every night share undiscovered stories.
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>> protests across egypt as supporters of muhammed morsi takes to the streets. he is on trial with other men accused of inciting rights and murder. >> possible retribution from the taliban as a suspected drone strike kills a leader of the taliban. >> the accused gunman in the los angeles airport shooting gives police critical information about the deadly attack. police are still trying to answer the question of why. >> >> he represents here what people are silent about.
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>> achieving change through music, giving cuban citizens a voice to speak out. >> welcome to aljazeera america. i'm stephanie sy. >> i'm thomas drayden. let's get you caught up on the top stories. the trial of ousted egyptian president mohamed morsi is on hold for now. court proceedings got underway for a few hours this morning before officials adjourned until early neck year. outside the courthouse, people gathered to pro testify the trial with the muslim brotherhood vowing to press on with demonstrations for their former leader. >> new details are emerging about the deadly shooting at los angeles international airport. a clearer picture is developing about the accused gunman and why he targeted t.s.a. workers.
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>> coming up later this morning, we'll talk with an expert on middle east policy about the purported u.s. drone strike that killed a taliban leader in pakistan and how that could affect tense relations between the u.s. and pakistan. >> afghanistan ranks as the worst country in the world for the elderly. we'll find out why many are forced to keep working well into their old age. >> for the first time since his overthrow four months ago, egypt's ousted president emerges from detention to face trial. the government is charging him with inciting murder. morsi does not recognize the charges, telling accusers they belong on trial. we report. >> supporters of the deposed president mohamed morsi outside the cairo police academy, where the former leader is on trial. they say he was forced from office illegally, and they
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demand the charges against him be dropped. mohamed morsi is charged with inciting others to commit murder in connection with the deaths of several people killed in street fighting outside a presidential palace in december. 20,000 members of the security forces are on the streets of cairo determined to make sure the trial goes ahead. public opinion about it is polarized. >> god will be on our side. the court will issue a verdict that will be for the sake of egypt and the egyptians to move forward. morsi was not fair at all. >> this trial has nothing to do with being fair or unfair. the man was the president. he had the full right to do whatever he wanted and to contact whoever he wanted. >> hundreds of people died in the 2011 revolution to force his predecessor mubarak from power. millions had high hopes when
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morsi became the countries first democratically elected president, but increasingly frustrated with what they saw as his author tearian rule, many ejections took to the streets again. >> the difference between the trial of morsi and mubarak is mubarak hat authority while morsi insists he is the president. he is the president of the republic. >> if morsi is convicted, he could be sentenced to death. aljazeera, cairo. >> let's go to a closer look of how egypt slipped into
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instability. >> egypt has been a whirl wind of events over the past two years. as part of a series of revolutions across the middle east that came to be known as the arab spring, egyptians took to the streets in january of 2011. millions of egyptians upset with police brutality and a lock of basic freedoms called for the ouster of president mubarak. protests raged for weeks until mubarak stepped down, handing power to the military. by june, the muslim brotherhood was in power and egypt had its first democratically elected president, mohamed morsi. in january of 2013, one year after mubarak was overthrown, egyptians unhappy with the new islamic constitution again packed tahrir square, calling for the new president, mohamed morsi to step down. in july, the military removed
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morsi from office and supreme court's new justice in stalled as the incident rim president. in august, the egyptian military cracked down on morsi supporters in cairo. 600 civilians were killed and the interim president called for marshall law. president obama strongly condemned the government attack but chose not to cut $1 billion the u.s. provides annually to egypt in military aid. by september, mubarak is released. morsi and 14 other members of the muslim brotherhood are charged with inciting killings. last month, the obama administration announced a freeze on military assistance to egypt as military officials insist they do not want to damage the relationship between the two countries. >> in egypt right now, protests are winding down now that the trial has adjourned for the day. hhe will be moved to a prison in
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alexandria until his trial resumes in january. >> the second stop of a whirl wind tour in the middle east for asks kerry. he is expected to discuss syria with the king in saudi arabia. he says they share the same goals. he says both countries want a transitional government in syria that does not include president assad. >> pakistan will review its relationship with the u.s. after a drone strike killed the leader of the pakistani taliban who died friday near the afghanistan border. the attack threatens to derail peace talks with the militants launched just last week. a local political party wants to block nato supply routes into afghanistan. >> the man accused in the deadly
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shooting friday at the los angeles airport told police he acted alone. new details are emerging about the suspect from those who knew him. >> a photographer snapped this picture of terrified passengers hiding inside a bathroom stall at los angeles international airport while a gunman opened fire. the suspected shooter, 23 targeted transportation security administration workers in the airport. his first victim, officer hernandez shot repeatedly at point-blank range. >> he made a conscious decision to kill multiple t.s.a. employees. >> he also shot t.s.a. officer james spear and tony grigsby. both are recovering. another was hit in the leg. moments before the attack, police see his friend dropped him off at the airport, unaware
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of his plan. a criminal complaint filed saturday in federal court says he had a duffle bag containing a smith and wesson assault rifle and five magazines of ammo, along with a handwritten letter addressing the t.s.a. directly. his former classmates, stunned by the news, remembering him as an introvert, a loaner. >> he was like a shy guy. he always tent to himself, was always walking around by himself, didn't really talk to anybody at all. >> i'm absolutely shocked. >> his former roommate paints a similar picture of the out of work motorcycle mechanic who recently moved to los angeles from a small new jersey town. >> i didn't have any issues with him. he was a really nice guy, a bit loaner, introverted, but nothing that i would ever, ever expect him to do something like this. >> the police chief in new jersey is speaking on behalf of the suspect's family. >> we don't know what happened out in l.a. we don't know, they want to turn
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the stones over and try to find out. it's very emotional for the whole team. >> the f.b.i. said he had no previous record. it's not clear why he targeted t.s.a. officers, but authorities say he was ready to die in the attack. aljazeera. >> authorities believe he bought his weapons legally in los angeles. right now, he is hospitalized and unresponsive after being shot four times by police. >> an alabama airport reopens hours after evacuation because of a bomb threat. birmingham airport officials found a note warning of a bomb. they called in the f.b.i. a search turned up nothing. the airport was operating again two hours later. a dozen flights were delayed or diverted. >> a tourist ferry sinks off thailand killing six people. it happened near the popular thai resort area, taking on
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water and capsizing. the boat's capacity was 150. there may have been more than 200 passengers onboard. there was not enough life vests to go around. >> when the storm season comes in myanmar, many people leave. a boat was carrying a group of a muslim minority. nearly 200 people have been killed in the violence and more than 100,000 people are in camps. many like those still missing have tried to three. >> heavy rain and high wednesday are hitting mexico's pacific coast. tropical depression made landfall. officials lifted severe weather warnings as it came ashore along a coastal town. some cities could still see flash flooding. some areas could get six to 10 inches of rain.
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it is expected to lose steam as it moves inland. >> winter is knocking on fall doors in the u.s. >> we are feeling it here. >> 30 degrees have been reported. >> let's get the latest on the temperatures. >> good morning. >> good morning. whenever i went outside last night, i wanted to go running and unfortunately wasn't able to do so. it was so cold, temperatures in new york city dropping back into the thirds. as we start our day, so cold out there. as well. we have a frontal boundary push through. there's another front on the way. behind it, high pressure is going to be building into the region, so not a lot of cloud cover to hold in heat we get through the course of the day. you can see the frontal boundary, high pressure building behind it. it's going to be sunny, beautiful, but chilly. look at temperatures in cleveland. right now it feels like 26 degrees, back in pittsburgh it this one and 24 in the city of brotherly love.
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look at the temperatures highs here today, 42 in toronto, back into philly 48. ten degrees below where we should be at this time of the year. the area of high pressure is going to bring in the warmth and sunshine even across portions of the southeast. if you are traveling along 95 here and also on the beaches across florida, rough surf and rip currents are possible. please be careful. temperatures across the southeast nice and comfortable, beautiful with temps in the 60's in atlanta clear back to birmingham. i'll tell you about the snow in the north in a bit. >> thank you. >> a middle school math teacher shot to death last month is requesting remembered. he was a former marine and master sergeant in the national guard. he was given full military ors during a memorial service. he was killed by a seventh grader who wounded two other students before killing himself. >> french officials are
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reporting the killings of two. they had been warned that their assignment in the west african nation was dangerous. >> nobody knows who took them or oh why they were killed. the two worked for radio france international. they were found dead just a few kilometers away from the kidal. the rebel they interviewed describes what happened. >> i heard an unusual noise in the street. the car was parked in front of my house about 10 meters from the the door. i went out to see what was happening. once i got to the door, i saw a car, a pickup parked next to theirs. there was a man on the ground who had a weapon. he pointed at me and said go back inside, go back. i went in and shortly afterwards, they took off with
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the two journalists. they left in a great hurry. >> an official statement in paris said that the french military had warned the journalists not to go to the area. rebel groups linked to al-qaeda are still active there, despite a french-led military intervention earlier this year. >> al-qaeda fighters are known to fund their activities with ransom money. the french military says it did not have any contact with the kidnappers in this case. france's foreign minister said sunday that the journalists were coldly assassinated, adding that security in the region would be increased. >> a crime against journalists is a crime against people who were coldly assassinated in despicable conditions. it's also a crime against the freedom to in form and be
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informed. >> the french president has now demanded a reappraisal of security in mali. aljazeera, paris. >> we should point out the journalists were covering preparations for upcoming parliamentary elections. they had been warned for self months now. back in march, there was another attack, a radio reporter stabbed in the head. >> journalists get warned and warned about going into these risky situations. they still go. we still go, because it's important, the story's important. i can only imagine that they felt that way in covering this important story in mali. >> n.s.a. whistle blower edward snowden sounding off. >> we're going to tell you what's in his open letter. why he's asking the u.s. for clemency. >> it feels like 2012 all over again. mitt romney attacking president obama over health care. why the former presidential candidate jumped into the debate. >> a special look at aging
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around the globe, starting in afghanistan, where life expectancy is among the lowest in the world. >> we're taking a live look at egypt right now. the protests there, you can see breaking up very quickly, just an hour ago. we saw hundreds of people outside of the courthouse where mohamed morsi's trial has just been adjourned to the new year. we'll be right back.
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>> good morning. welcome back to aljazeera america. >> some democrats in washington are worried they're going to lose jobs over the ongoing n.s.a. scandal. we'll talk with an experienced democratic strategist. >> let's get a look at what temperatures we can expect to see across the nation. i'm he can specking a lot of low temperatures. >> a lot of low temperatures. it's chilly out there this morning. these are not actual temperatures, but this is what it feels like when you think about the wind pushing out of the north and west and the cool
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air mass that's taken over with high pressure in troll. in toronto, it feels like 29. right now in new york, it feels like 30. 24 in philadelphia, here's our high temperatures today in the 40's across much of the northeast. back to you all. >> thank you. >> there will be no clemency for edward snowden. the former n.s.a. contractor is asking for leniency from the u.s. government, but the white house and some members of congress denied his request. snowden believes he sparked an important debate about u.s. spying. he leaked secret government documents about the n.s.a., including information that the u.s. has been spying on its allies. if he returns to the u, snowden faces charges of espionage. he is currently living in russia where he was granted sigh come. >> after the government shutdown and debt ceiling crisis, democrats are riding high with most americans blaming republicans for the financial mess. now it's the democrats who are worrying because of the growing spying scandal involving the
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n.s.a. to help us break down the possible political fallout for congressional democrats who fear they may pay the price in the 2014 mid term elections, we are joined by our guest. >> i think it's rather obvious at this point because allies are upset and are uncomfortable, the notion that the united states is engaging in spying on its allies and others for the first time is a bit absurd. we all know most countries do engage in this behavior. the problem and the challenge for the obama administration is that people thought that he would be different, that he would break from some of those policies. i do think of all of the different controversies that surround a president, this president or any president. >> that can't be good news for the president, especially with his approval ratings slipping. >> i do think the spying
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controversy is probably going to be the most problematic for the obama administration. mow president's do encounter controversy, they are no stranger to it. this is the most problematic. what the president needs to do is get out there forcefully as transapparently as possible within this context, say i own this, i will fix this, and put in place policies to correct it and course correct. i think again, the challenges for him is that a lot of democrats were upset by this. a lot of other scandals, the republicans manufacturing things to go after him for political purposes, witch hunts and so fort, but this angered people who are part of the party. >> how does the president do that with in-fighting with hey he saying we need to end the program and dianne feinstein saying we have to continue the program. >> this is good, the debate going on.
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some people think yes, the n.s.a. should aggressively collect intelligence, figuring out ways to keep us safe. more people prefer that to us engaging in wars over terrorism or the drone program. i think that it's important for the democrats to bring it to the public in a way that encourages a discourse and hopefully garnering support around policies that can make this program workable while at the same time not as problematic. >> america's approval of congress is at an all time low. what can the democrats do to change that? >> i think there are a lot of things the democrats can do. i don't have a big problem with it being low for the republicans, but for the democrats, i think that one of the things they did that they didn't do well was when they did those town hall meetings, they had massive town hall meetings which allowed people there to obstruct meetings, create problems, come in and flood with silliness and anything activity.
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what they should do is meet with individual groups, serious groups, small business organizations, consumers groups, meet individually with these groups and talk about policy, talk about what they can be doing and that's a context where you won't have this kind of political chicanery that goes on. they can have one clear message from the party. >> you think this will move the 2014 mid term elections. >> it remains to be seen. unfortunately, the public has a short memory. we are in an environment when the next thing happens, everybody jumps on to the next thing. it depends whether more allegations come out. that's really going to be the primary determining factor and whether or not the president forcefully steps up and says look, this is what we're going to do to rectify this, which i think he will. >> hopefully the president's
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listening to you this morning and will do that. good to have you with us. >> thank you. >> mitt romney is slamming president obama over the affordable care act. the former republican presidential candidate said he's unhappy about how the president is comparing the rollout of the federal plan with a similar law he signed as governor of massachusetts. >> in massachusetts, we phased in the requirements so that there was a slow rollout. that way you could test the systems as you went looking for glitches. perhaps the most important lesson the president failed to learn was you have to tell the american people the truth. when you told the american people that you could keep your health insurance if you wanted to keep that plan, period that he said that time and again, he wasn't telling the truth. >> romney says the economy has salad and that the u.s. has lost international credibility since president obama was reelected. >> to business news now this morning. a new poll indicates older americans are opposed to any
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changes to social security benefits. the associated press survey finds people 50 and older oppose changing the way kola raises are calculated. they oppose raising the eligibility raise. more want more generous benefits. they show support for proposals that would impact high earners. >> blackberry has been shopping for potential buyers and today the bids are do. fairfax financial is expected to make its offer. the company made a conditional $4.7 billion offer for blackberry in september. now it's if i believe. others reportedly interested in the smart phone company include facebook, micro cost and the company's co founders. >> if u.s. airways wants to merge, the airline would have to undear slots at key airlines. the airlines are prepared to
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give up terminal spaces outside washington. settlement talks between the airline and justice democratic are underway. both sides are ready to go to trial starting november 25. >> stock futures are higher now signaling a positive start when trading gets underway in just a couple of hours now. wall street has been enjoying the federal reserve's cheap money policy, pushing stocks to record highs recently. here's where we stand this morning. the dow is 15,615, the s&p 500 is 1761, the nasdaq at 3922. this week, investors are waiting for friday unemployment report. it could determine how well retailers do in the holiday shopping season. one analyst warns with pure people working, there is less money to spend. >> retailers are desperate now. we have six less shopping days, as you know this year versus last year, and we are in a very
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tough time, united states. i am not predicting stellar holiday sales this year. >> luxury goods are expected to do very well. >> they're called the golden years, a time when older people are supposed to reap the regards of a lifetime worth of work to for many senior citizens around the world, they cannot afford to survive if they stop working. in a series focusing on the world's senior citizens, we go to afghanistan, ranked the worst country in the world for the elderly. >> for the elderly, life here is the toughest in the world. that's according to a recent survey which says afghanistan is the worst country to grow old in. in kabul, it is common to see elderly men working. their children don't have enough income to support them further. >> this is where kabul's elderly come to find out how much they will get in their monthly
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pensions. if they worked for the tate for a set number of years, they are entitled to cash and will come and look at their details on the list. some of them get as little as $10 a month. >> few are lucky enough to get anything from the state. the culture in afghanistan leaves responsibility for the elderly to their children, but for many here, that simply means a small amount of food. most of like this man, not sure how old he is, perhaps 65. for him, age doesn't matter. he must have keep working to survive. it's grueling labor, chopping wood. he gets less than $2 for chopping over half a ton of logs. >> this is the 70 cents i've made so far. that's today's work. god is great, maybe by the evening, i'll make another dollars. i will pay to go home and we will buy toe states and bread.
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we will seat it for dinner. tomorrow morning, i'll come here and do it again. >> he doesn't blame the government. he says they have their own problems. >> the government cannot stand on their own feet. today, they are taking help from other countries, how can they help other people. if the government cannot help themselves, how can they help the population? >> he lives in the outskirts of the city in a poor district. today at home, there's not much to eat beyond tea and bread. his wife knows there would not be that much if he ever can't work. to her, it is a brutal reality she accepts. >> if you don't have an income, you must die. death comes early in afghanistan. most die at around the same age as this man and his wife, but for those who survive longer, their final years are a continued struggle against conditions rarely seen elsewhere in the world. jane ferguson, aljazeera, kabul,
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afghanistan. >> in our next hour, our series focus on people living longer and healthier lives. many people there are in their 90's and beyond and still incredibly active. they'll share their secrets to the fountain of youth. >> the death of a taliban leader from a sufficient drone strike. >> it's creating problems for the u.s.-pakistanie relationship. >> protestors in iran hold a death to america rally. >> a second chance to across the finish line. new york city marathoners try to outrun the past in a super storm that dashed their dreams last year. >> coming up in sports, we'll look at rookie head coach jason kidd and his nba coaching debut.
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america tonight goes deeper with groundbreaking investigative coverage of the nation's top stories... >> a fresh take on the stories that connect to you... >> live news at 8 and 11 eastern followed by america tonight on al jazeera america there's more to it.
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[[voiceover]] no doubt about it, innovation changes our lives. opening doors ... opening possibilities. taking the impossible from lab ... to life. on techknow, our scientists bring you a sneak-peak of the future, and take you behind the scenes at our evolving world. techknow - ideas, invention, life.
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>> good morning, welcome back. >> these are our top stories. >> the trial of mohamed morsi is on hold until next year. he is on trial with 14 officials of the muslim brotherhood, charged with inciting murder against their political opponents. >> police spoke with the suspect in the los angeles airport shoot i can, saying he told them he acted alone. one person was killed and three others wounded friday by gunfire in a security screening area. >> pakistan says it will review its relationship with the united states after a drone strike killed the leader of the pakistani taliban. political parties in the country want to stop nato supplies to afghanistan because of the strikes. >> the drone strike that killed a leader of pakistan's taliban is further weakening relations
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with the u.s. the strike killed the leader. routes to afghanistan may be blocked. we report the taliban also want revenge. >> this man says he shouldn't have come to work today, but says he can't afford to stay home. he tells us he fears reprizal attacks by the pakistani taliban after the u.s. killed its leader in an unmanned aerial drone strike. people have stopped coming to market. i don't know what to do. >> his fears are based on experience. the market where he works has been attacked several times by the taliban. just last month, his uncle was killed in a bombing. all across pakistan, security is on high alert after the taliban
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threatened to avenge the death, saying every drop of its former leader's blood will be turned into a suicide bomber. besides the fear, there's also anger. in a media briefing on saturday, interior minister blamed the u.s. for destroying the nation's peace process with the pakistani taliban. >> the efforts have been ambushed. it was an ambush and we see it as an ambush. >> other political parties want more than angry words with washington. the border of taliban's strong hold in the tribal area demands that industry routes be closed. >> i will raise the issue on monday in the national assembly that nato supply line should be
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blocked until drone attacks stop. we will not allow supply lines to enter until they stop the drone attacks. >> privately, many people in the pakistani government, military and intelligence agencies are pleased with the death. he was responsible for carrying out several major attacks, claiming thousands of lives. he was also open to peace talks with the government, and now that is under threat as the pakistani taliban threatens to avenge his death. aljazeera, islamabad. >> a u.s. lawmaker defends that drone strike. the chairman of the house's permanent intelligence committee said the attack will protect american troops. >> this is the guy that's trying to create the problems both for pakistan he relates with afghanistan taliban. these are the folks that closed 500 schools, most of them girls schools in the eastern
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provinces. he's part of the network which is basically a organized crime group operating in pakistan involved in supporting al-qaeda, taliban and others. this was a bad guy. by the way, there's information recently that concerned us about the safety of our troops. i feel a little better for our troops today than i did before this event happened. >> rogers said he had ties to the failed attempt to bomb new york's time square three years ago. >> pakistan's government is blaming the u.s. for derailing peace talks with the taliban. joining us now is a contributor or global post.com who has studied drone strikes extensively, as well as middle east policy. mr. shaw, thanks so much for being with us. he had a $5 million bounty on his head. do you agree he was a bad guy?
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what were his crimes. >> his biggest crime was he orchestrated the attack in september 2010 and he showed up in a video and claimed responsibility for that. also, he was involved in the times square bombing. i think, and he had $5 million bounty on him, so i think as americans have been taking out many other militant commanders, he was among one of them, so i'm not surprised if the americans killed him in a drone attack. >> the americans will know doubt say this is a victory and not everyone views it that way. can you talk about why? >> i mean, pakistan has reservations about this, saying the timing is not perfect. i don't think the americans have ever greed they won't attack
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this commander. >> why is the timing not good? because of the peace talks that started last week no. >> exactly. pakistan says because of the peace talks, we are not happy with this, but i think you have to take this whole debate on the drones in the context of the end game in afghanistan. pakistan doesn't want the drone strikes to continue and doesn't want the americans to take out militants. despite the fact that pakistan has been the beneficiary of the attacks. >> why doesn't it want to take out militants? >> because post 2014, the americans are going to stay and their main focus will be object counter intelligence now and the drones will continue to be the weapons of choice with the americans. pakistan currently harbors america's worst enemies. many are there, so pakistan has
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serious concerns about the continued american presence and use of drones in this war. >> it's a target-rich environment, oned say. you have not only done a lot of reporting on the drones, but born there, raised there as a young child when it was a beautiful, peaceful place. how do you think locals feel about drone strikes like these. in this case we don't know of any civilian casualties. we do know this is a taliban commander responsible for the deaths of thousands of people. >> there is a very favorable view of the drones among the local population, because the alternative to drone attack is military operations. currently, we have more than 700,000 people who have been displaced by the pakistani military in these operations. the fact is that as i mentioned earlier, not a single taliban commander has been killed in 10 years of war by the pakistani military. all of these have been taken out
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by the u.s. drones, people, if you give them two choices, either it's the military operations or the drone attacks, so people will go for the drone attacks, because of its precision, because of its accuracy, and less collateral damage and the fact that no one has been displaced by the drones, while a lot of people have been displaced by the military operations. >> what about the collateral damage. there were recent reports from amnesty international that there are a lot of innocent men, women and children killed in these attacks, not only in pakistan, but yemen. >> i totally agree with coma amnesty international says. what is coming out of pakistan is a really controlled information environment. one of the incidents which they mention in their report and the family was brought here is one case. we really don't know. you cannot verify them.
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the drones have been effective on the ground, but narratives surrounding the drones has been the u.s. has lost that narrative to the pakistanis and they have by controlling the information very effectively promoted this narrative, anti drone narrative in which they blame it to be against they're as he veinty. >> even though wikileaks show they may have been complicit in drone attacks. we're going to have to leave it here. i hope you'll come back and speak more are to us. thank you. >> thank you. >> forme form bail paves the waf former president musharif to leave his house. he still faces charges in the detention of judges in the
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deaths of pakistani prime minister. >> big crowds are gathered outside the former u.s. embass in tehran for a death to america rally. thirty years ago, american staffers were held hostage. in recent months, talks have gun with u.s. >> thousands have come out to to support students day in tehran and remember the hostage taking and takeover of the sufficient embassy here in tehran, a very, very large compound. the crowds stretched all the way past the embass and down the street, probably thousands of people here a little less than in previous years. the sentiment is absolutely one of defiance regardless of what's going on on the international political stage, the people here still see the united states as the great satan and do not support the normalization of
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relations with america. now it comes with a positive diplomatic also mere, of course that phone call between president obama and the iranian president and talks. although most support the normalization of relations with the united states. the people here, the thousands here are still 100% opposed to the united states. >> reporting from tehran. these protests take place every november, but this year, groups such as the revolutionary guard have been calling for a major showing and the return of the death to america chants. >> a signature new york event returned to loud cheers. [ cheers and applause ] >> huge crowds saw you a tight race in the new york marathon, two kenyans crossing the finish line, the first time kenyans
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have won the men and women's divisions. it was a 26.2-mile race. this was about more than titles. last years marathon was canceled because of super storm sandy. the return of the event was a symbol of recovery. >> great to see that back in our city. >> we have sports, and a new era began yesterday for the brooklyn nets. >> we'll start with a bit of a riddle. what do mark jackson, scott brooks, mark d'antoni and doc rivers have in common? we are all former nba point guards who made the transition to coaches. one of the greatest point guards of all time is trying to join their ranks in brooklyn. we have the story. >> there's a new sheriff in brooklyn and his name is jason kidd. the all-star rejoins his former team, this time as the nets new head coach. >> it's a learning process, one as a coach, and two, the media
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is over the top. it's part of the game, and it's something that i've embraced. >> jason is a proven winner and leader with an incredible wealth of basketball knowledge and experience, which makes the move a natural transition. >> i could talk as a player and a coach, but i'm trying to put coach aside. the more i spend time with coaches, i'm speaking their language. >> despite taking the head coaching job just nine days after retiring as a player, his former competition likes the move. >> he's definitely going to be a players' cove. he just retired, so he's going to be i think very understanding and a guy who i think everybody, you know, the whole team really looks up to. >> and look at his resume, secondall time in the nba in assists and steals, a two time olympic gold medalist and nba
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champion. >> jason is a porch winner. he has won before. he was a great leader. i played with him a couple years, in the olympics and got to see him firsthand, and never forget it. >> what jason has brought to the game over time, everybody understands he's been one of the greatest players as one of the best i.q.'s that we've ever seen as a basketball player and he's well respected. >> i've always taken pepto to settle my nerves. basketball is something that you can never control, you know, it's something that you don't know how it's going to turn out. >> kidd is surrounded by a well seasoned coaching staff to keep his nerves calm. >> i'm very lucky to have coach frank, you talk about one of the best in this league, very prepared, has been a head coach,
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has been an assistant coach, worked his way up, and so to have him on my staff, i'm very lucky. >> one thing is for sure, after a disappointing season last year, the nets plan to do things the right way, jason kidd's way. >> he goes 110 miles an hour, he works at the same rate. if you're not working at that same rate, he's going to tell you about it. >> when he spoke, people listen. he has the ultimate respect of everyone in that locker room and he's ready to lead this team. >> there's always something to be proven. do i know what i'm doing? yes. will i make a mistake and maybe sit somewhere too long? i think every coach has done that, but my goal is no hidden agenda. we want to win. we want to win now. >> aljazeera. >> kidd made his coaching debut in orlando last night after
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serving a two game suspension. they are now 1-2 on the season. that's sports. >> a treasure trove find. >> masterpiece that is disappeared during nazi control in germany. >> hiphop being used to change a country. musicians in cuba use music to change a decades old system. unconventional wisdom.
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what happens when social media
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>> good morning, welcome back to aljazeera america. >> how young people in cuba are using hiphop music to give a voice to the voiceless. >> let's get a look at what potential precipitation we're looking at today. simply put, wet weather, right? >> yes, the rain coming down across portions of texas because of this area of low pressure. tropical storm sonia across the mountains of mexico is going to
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travel across into texas. how much rain, two to four inches locally. we could see four to six inches across the north and eastern portions of texas. that will make its way further to the north along a frontal boundary for tuesday into wednesday in chicago, you need your umbrella. towards the northwest, you'll see a bit of snow. >> thank you. >> it's build as an art discovery of epic pro pores. an 80-year-old man in germany is under investigation after authorities found more than 1500 masterpieces in his small munich apartment. the loot includes last works by many artists. the paintings are believed to have been confiscated by nazi. the man was the son of an art dealer who insisted that the art had been destroyed. the stash is said to be worth well over $1 billion. >> in cuba, a new generation pushes for change in the social and economic system.
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as we report, they're making their voices heard in a uniquely american style. ♪ ♪ >> he wraps about his life, family and cuba. his artistic name means the potion man. he says that here, his music is received as a threat. >> i think that hiphop is not convenient for the government, because our society has had the same system for the last 50 years. our songs can open the hearts and minds of people. we represent what people here are silent about. ♪ ♪ >> in the land of salsa, rhumba and cha-cha, it arrived in the
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1980s to the radio stations. in 1990, the government authorized the first festival. >> this is are where it was born, a housing project in the periphery of havana. even though rap is not the most popular type of music in cuba, young people here tell us that they turn to it to express the frustrations of their daily lives. >> this man is a graphic designer that sings for change. he's also a government employee, an example that authorities are more open to criticism when it comes with music. >> hiphop is a culture of protest that is difficult to develop here for obvious reasons. even though there is a government agency and we get little help from them, i have to do everything myself. the big problem we face is the lack of information. there is almost no internet for example and that is a big problem for young people. >> in spite of the criticism in the lyrics, rap is hardly a
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threat to the government. mainly, because it lacks promotion. this man is trying to change that. >> everything is difficult. there are obstacles all the time. we built this studio with a lot of effort. i'm working so rappers can be heard all around the island. >> that's what people like this man would like to see, so that young people here can use rap to get their message out. ♪ ♪ aljazeera, havana. >> the united nations called last week for the u.n. to end the embargo, but has conducted such votes for decades. >> the trial of former egyptian president mohamed morsi has been put on hold until next year. he is accused of inciting the murder of protestors last year. >> the accused gunman in the deadly los angeles independent shooting reportedly talked with police moments after his
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rampage, saying he acted alone. >> pakistan says it is going to review its relationship with the u.s. after a u.s. drone strike killed the leader of the pakistani taliban. >> there's concern for the health and well being of two members of the nfl community this morning. details next our in sports. >> heavy rain on the way to texas. some areas could see six inches. amajor cooldown is on the way for the northeast. >> while the trial of mohamed morsi may have been delayed, the country's military is looking to make changes to its suspended constitution. how egyptian civilians could face the same type of military tribunal as the former egyptian president.
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>> it is a traditional form of fighting hundreds of years of age and in danger of being knocked out but mixed martial arts. >> detailing the life of nelson mandela. what his family said about how
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his struggles and successes are portrayed. >> good morning. welcome to aljazeera america. i'm del walters. the first day of trial for egyptianed ousted president is now over, but it's controversy is not. demonstrators in cairo, egypt's military government accusing him of inciting murder. his leaders say it is political and part of the crackdown on the muslim brotherhood. 14 brotherhood leaders are still on trial. egypt's military government was
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urged to continue restoring democracy. a referendum is planned on its constitution, planned for next year. >> obviously part of the roadmap and part of the process of strengthening egypt's linkages to the rest of the world will be measured in the way in which the people of egypt are sustained in their ability to have the right to assemble, the right to express themselves, but even as they do that, we also agree no one should be allowed to practice violence with impunity. >> more than 20,000 police and soldiers taking to the streets trying to prevent violence, and there are reports that the first day of mores trial did not go smoothly. with those chanting against his
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prosecution. morsi himself refused to cooperate. >> clearly, he is not respecting the judges, not respecting the due process of the court. he's not respecting the fact he's even there. it really begs the question as to how he's going to defend his position if he is not going to embrace the fact that he's on trial and there's no getting away from that. he will be tried anyway. he's standing along with the other muslim brotherhood defendants. there are actually seven of them alongside of him, even though another 14 are also being tried, some of his senior muslim brotherhood officials. they apparently we were hearing earlier, starting chanting in the court to try to disrupt the proceedings, as well. they're doing everything they can to not allow this court case to carry on. you really have to question as to whether that's a tactic that
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will last throughout the day. >> now that the court has adjourned, morsi is moved to a prison until his trial resumes in january. >> secretary of state john kerry is in saudi arabia right now, his second stop in the tour of the middle east, discussing the situation with irsyria and negotiations over iran's nuclear program today in a meeting with the king. relations have been strained with syria being a major sticking point. secretary kerry said the u.s. and saudi arabia share the same goals in syria, both wanting to see a transitional government in syria that does not include president bashar al assad. >> demonstrators gathering today outside the former u.s. embassy in tehran for a death to america rally. 34 years ago, iranian students took u.s. workers hostage.
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this year's demonstration comes as the president has been making overitures to the u.s. government. more now from aljazeera. >> thousands have come out to support students day in tehran. remember the hostage taking and takeover of the u.n. embassy here in tehran, a very, very large compound, the crowds stretched all the way past the embassy and down the street, probably thousands of people here. the sentiment is absolutely one of the defiance. people here still see the united states of the great satan and do not sport the normalization of relations with america. the phone call between president obama and the iranian president,
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now although most support normal sedation of relations with the united states, as i said, the people here are still 100% opposed to the united states. >> these protests take place every november, but this year, groups such as the revolutionary guard in iran have called for a major showing and the return to that death to america chance. >> pakistan says it's going to review its relationship with the u.s. after that drone strike killed the leader of the taliban. he was killed friday. authorities say the attack threatens to derail the peace talks with the militants. those talks started just last week. politicians want to block nato supply routes into afghanistan. >> a u.s. lawmakers is defending that strike. the chairman of the house intelligence committee saying that attack is going to protect american troops. >> this is the guy trying to
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create the problems for pakistan. he relates with afghanistan taliban. these are the folks that closed 500 schools, most of them girls schools in the eastern provinces of afghanistan. he's part of the network which is basically a giant organized crime group operating in the tribal areas of pakistan, who have been involved in supporting al-qaeda, taliban, and others. this was a bad guy. by the way, there's some information recently that concerned us about the safety of our troops. i feel a little better for our troops today than i did before this event happened. >> rogers also saying the leader had ties to the attempted bombing of times square two years ago. >> the gunman of the l.a. international airport told
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police he acted alone. >> a photographer snapped this picture of terrified passengers hiding inside a bathroom stall at los angeles international airport while a gunman opened fire. police say the suspected shooter targeted transportation security administration workers at the airport. his first victim, officer hernandez shot repeatedly at point-blank range. >> he made a conscious decision to kill multiple t.s.a. employees. >> he also shot t.s.a. officers james spear and tony grigsby. both are covering. the fourth victim was hit in the leg. moments before the attack, police say the man's friend dropped him at the airport, unaware of his plan. the criminal complaint filed saturday in federal court said he had a duffle bag containing an assault rifle and five
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magazines full of ammo, along with a handwritten letter addressing the t.s.a. directly. his former classmates stunned by the news, remember him as an introvert, a loaner. >> he was like a shy guy. he also kept to himself, was always walking around by himself, didn't really talk to anybody at all. >> i'm just absolutely shocked. >> his former roommate paints a similar picture of the out of work motorcycle mechanic who recently moved to los angeles from a small new jersey town. >> i didn't have any issues with him or thinking. he was a really nice guy, a bit loaner, introverted, but nothing that i would ever, ever expect him to do something like this. >> the police chief in new jersey is speaking on behalf of the suspect's family. >> we don't know what happened out in l.a. we don't know and they really don't know, either. they want to, like i said last night, they want to turn the stones over and try to find out. they're very emotionally upset, the whole family.
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>> he had no previous record. right now, it's not clear why he targeted t.s.a. officers. authorities say he was ready to die in the attack. aljazeera. >> authorities believe he bought his weapons legally in los angeles. right now, he is in the hospital with wounds that he suffered in that shootout with police. he is not responsive. >> the birmingham airport is open after a threat shut it down there. it was evacuated for two hours sunday. officials at the airport say they called the f.b.i. after finding a threatening note. nothing was found during a search by the bomb squad. a dozen flights were diversed or delayed. >> a middle school math teacher shot to death last month is remembered as an educator who loved the students. michael lands bury was a former marine in the nevada air national guard. he was given full military ors sunday during his memorial
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service. he was killed by a seventh grader who then turned the gun on himself. >> residents along mexico's coast are slammed with heavy rains and high winds. sonia made landfall earlier this morning. she slammed the coastal down of el dorado with winds of 35 miles an hour. some cities could see flash flooding, as much as six to 10 inches of rain is predicted. it is expected to lose steam as she moves inland over the mountain was mexico. it seems mexico has been slammed storm after storm after storm this season. we have a look at the severe weather that is pounding that region. >> we are going to continue to see sonia weaken as it fraction further toward the north. it's going to impact texas.
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the early part of the season, it was slammed by two storms, ingrid and manuel, triggering mud slides across the region, hundred was folks lost their lives there. today, that storm is weakening significantly, but the moisture is traveling towards the east, the northeast over the sierra mad day right into texas. they're going to see heavy rain. you can see the moisture on satellite and the rain is making its way into northeastern portions of texas. that's the story here today. that rain travels further toward the north. we can see four to six inches of rain across central portion of texas, to 24 inches of rain towards dallas and houston. the rain is going to push through dallas and toward the north into chicago, as we track on into tuesday and wednesday, highs in the 50's, mostly cloudy, overcast skies. luckily by the end of the week, we're going to see sunshine.
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cooler air mass taking over, our high of 45 wednesday. looking at mostly cloudy, overcast skies to start our day out, we're going to have to deal with know across i-90 in portions of idaho. be careful out there. >> president obama was on the campaign trail over the weekend. not for himself, but for a fellow democratic. terry mcauliffe is running for governor of virginia, the president sharing the stage with the former d.n.c. chairman, trying to link his republican opponent to the government shutdown. >> you've seen an extreme faction of the republican party that has shown again and again and again that they're willing to highjack the entire party and the country and the economy and grind progress to an absolute halt if they don't get 100% of what they want. >> mcauliffe is leading in the
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polls over the republican. there's a governor's race taking place in new jersey where voters will decide whether to reelect incumbent chris christie. >> the senate is taking up an anti discrimination bill today, which would ban workplaces against the gay and lesbian workers. the issue failed in 1996. >> it's an american town that is home to some of the longest living, healthiest people in the world. what some say is the surprisingly simple key to their amazing longevity. >> an artist in new york finds inspiration from political unrest thousands of miles away. >> the 1-2, covering up.
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>> muay thai boxing being overwhelmed by its cousin, mixed martial arts.
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>> good morning. welcome back to aljazeera america. i'm del walters. just ahead, why some fear a centuries old tradition is about to be eclipsed by the rising popularity of mixed martial arts. first, let's get a look at your temperatures today. >> good morning, it's bitterly cold on the northeast this morning, new york particularly. right now, it feels like 23 degrees in new york city, 24 in philadelphia when you factor in the winds pushing in out of the north and west. high pressure's building and it's going to be a chilly day with temperatures 5-10 degrees below where they should be this time of the year. 48 in philadelphia for a day time high, almost at 50 in our nation's capitol. back to you, del. >> for centuries, thigh land's national sport has been muay
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thai boxing. the game may be taking it on the chin from a more modern form of fighting. >> a 500-year-old tradition originally used only by royal thai soldiers, it is a close combat fighting. it is still practiced at muay thai where each begins with a traditional dance. muay thai is the main discipline that makes up m.m.a., with a rapidly expanding international fan base, light on tradition and heavy on glitz, it has arrived in bangkok. will it knockout the traditional form? >> i don't think m.m.a. will take over muay thai, i think muay thai is rooted deeply in the culture in thailand, but i
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think m.m.a. has a strong presence around the world. >> global appeal doesn't matter to the man from good morning sports authority. m.m.a. is banned in the country. not true to the promoter who hosted the first fight night in bangkok. >> in 2012, there was an announcement made by a person from sports authority of thailand saying that the government of thigh land would be banning the sport of mixed martial arts, but that never happened. >> why some muay thai purists see the centuries old practice diluted. others see it as a way to expose a wider audience and provide more opportunity for the fighters here. >> this man has been training locals and foreigners for 15 years. >> just like brazil, with its
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number one sport, you bring basketball in and it's only ok to a certain level, but not as great as football. but m.m.a. might affect the muay thai industry. boxers might want to shift because of the higher prize money in m.m.a. >> while there are no clearances to the legality of professional m.m.a. in thailand, there's that question the new sport is drawing fighters and their fans to its knee on lit rings. aljazeera, bangkok. >> mixed martial arts is gaining fans quickly in the automatic, before his still and japan. there's now a campaign to make it part of the olympics, that sport combining my thigh. >> itsue, wrestling, judo and boxing. it's watched by millions around the globe. >> stock futures higher at this hour and that could be a positive start that things would
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be well when trading gets underway in about an hour. there are several economic reports out this week. we're going to find out if the overall economy is doing well with a report on domestic product that is coming out thursday. sluggish growth is predict at the latest quarter. friday, we'll get a look at the jobs situation when unemployment physician come out. we'll see if there was an increase in wages and salaries for american workers. all these numbers are important to the fed as it debates when it will pull back from its stimulus program. wall street has been enjoying the cheap money policy for years, pushing stocks to record highs. that's where we stand this morning. the dow at 16, 615, the nasdaq at 3922. heading into the all important holiday shopping season, retailers worry that it could be bleak, especially if the jobs
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picture does not improve. one analyst said that luxury goods should do well. >> if you look at the american consumer, you have 40% of the consumers responsible for 60% of the spending. anyone that has exposure to that luxury consumer, so luxury cars, like tesla, luxury clothes, you're not going to see a lot of upside at retailers, luxury names like tiffany should do well. >> retailers have to contend with six fewer shopping days. you might want to look for sales and discounts earlier than usual. >> thursday, twitter makes its debut on the new york stock exchange and wall street is all abuzz. the general public is more skeptical. a new poll is showing that 47% of americans don't think that buying twitter is a good move
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financially in what may be especially concerning to the company, 52% of americans between the agion of in a-34 say it's not a smart bet. >> a plea bargain is near, saying that federal prosecutors in manhattan are prepared to announce a deal dade. the steve run by steven a. cohen is expected to pay more than a billion dollars in criminal penalties, the largest ever for an insider trading case. also will plead guilty to insider trading. it has been one of the most popular hedge funds for decades. >> what is a small town in southern california have to do with towns in greece, costa rica and italy. they are known to have the healthiest people in the world.
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what makes them so special? we went to the only blue zone in the u.s. to find out. >> 60 miles east of downtown los angeles, you'll find loma linda, a university town in a blue zone, one of five places around the world where people live measurably longer, healthier lives. >> i'm 99 years old. >> the day we met ellsworth, we found him mowing his lawn and tending his garden. what's more remarkable, just four years ago, he retired from a long, successful career as a heart surgeon. >> as long as your hands are steady and eyes good, why, you can do it. i could do cardiac surgery right now. >> then with he met 84-year-old jim anderson exercising in the pool. >> it's just a great place to live. there's a lot of old people here, believe me. >> 77-year-old ida started
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taking spin classes two years ago, when she began training for a triathlon. >> there's times when you really think you can't move another foot, and then you stop and you say oh yes, i can. and you keep moving. >> ellsworth, jim and ida aren't just extremely active seen years, they're also seventh day adventists, a christian denomination which observes saturday as the holy day of rest. out of the population of 23,000, it's estimated nearly half are believers. >> seventh day adventives preach and practice daily rig rouse exercise at any age. they also encourage eating a plant-based diet with plenty of nuts, seeds, grains and beans. then there's the focus on a day of rest. each week, church members observe the sabbath. >> it gives you a final of
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physical rest, and it gives me a time when i can think on spiritual things. now, if there is such a thing as eternal life, that's worth thinking about. >> from the very beginning of the focus on health, it set seventh day adventists apart. >> the correlation between seventh day adventists and longevity is something he studied for years. >> this woman was an individual focused on older people can ride bicycles, drive cars, and so there's that ability of squaring off the mortality curve, which means that as you're aging, you're not in a nursing home, you're climbing mountains, doing exercise, walking around the streets. >> or swimming or spinning or mowing and of course eating healthy. the largest market is run by the church and sells on this vegetarian and vegan foods.
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>> we find that vegetarian actually have less cancer, less heart decease, less obesity, less stroke in almost every disease you look at. >> which ultimately leads to followers having more days, months and years. >> i've seen people around here in their hundreds. and so i guess i could live to be a century, too. >> for generations, people have often prayed to find the elusive fountain of youth, but for the seventh day adventists, living here, it seems their prayers have already been answered. >> healthier living and medical advances have pushed life expectance in the united states to 76 years for men. >> the associated press finds that 62% of american workers 50 and older don't want the
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government to change how it determines cost of living. 58% are against raising the age when retirees qualify for social security benefits and some say they should not be reduced for seen years with high in comes. >> ousted egyptian president mohamed morsi facing charges that he incited murder. what could be a change in the countries constitution to make it easier for the military to try civilians. >> congress is cracking down on sex assaults in the military. a key whistle blower at tail hook explaining how two offered bills could change things for women in the armed forces. >> a film detailing the trials and triumphs of nelson mandela, what his family is saying about this particular movie. >> an nfl coach collapses on his way to the half time locker room. we'll fill you in on the latest details, ahead in sports.
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that's engaging, powerful, thought provoking... >> there's nothing but hopelessness... >> it's either kill or be killed... >> america tonight, right after live news at 8 and 11 eastern. >> welcome to al jazeera america i'm john seigenthaler, and here's a look at the headlines... >> al jazeera america, there's more to it. determining using some sort of subjective interpretation of their policy as to whether or not your particular report was actually abusive, because if it doesn't contain language that specifically threatens you directly or is targeted towards you specifically, they may not consider it abuse. they may consider it offensive. and in that case they just recommend that you block that person. >> i don't want to minimise this, because i mean, there's
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some really horrible things that are on line, and it's not - it's not just twitter, what has happened through social media and the anonymity of the net is that you see websites, hate-filled websites targetting all sorts of groups, popping up. there has been a huge number of those that exist as well. what happens when social media uncovers unheard, fascinating news stories? >> they share it on the stream. >> social media isn't an after-thought, it drives discussion across america. >> al jazeera america's social >> al jazeera america's social ° you
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>> well cowboys cowboys cowboys becomes cowboys cowboys cowboys cowboys cowboys cowboys cowboys cowboys cowboymohamed morsi said the court had no jurisdiction to try him. >> thirty-four years ago today students over running the u.s. embassy? iran taking whos hogsthe suspecs
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angeles international airport shooting telling them scoops --. >> egypt has been a whirlwind of'vents. as part of a series of reach revolutions egyptians took to the streets in january of 2011. millions of egyptians upset with police brutality called for the ryremoval of mummar barak. mummar barak stepped do you knon handing over power to the military. by jube the must almos muslim bd was in power.
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in january of 2013 one year after mummar barak was over thrown. eyegyptians again packed the scr scare. scare -- square. this time they are calling for more sid t -- morsi to step dow. in august the egyptian military cracked down on morsi supporters and camped out at the mosque in cairo. 60600 civilians were killed and the interim president called for martial law. president obama condemned the government attack, but chose not to cut one billion dollars that the u.s. provides annually to egypt in military aid. by assessment mummar bar bein ms released.
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>> american officials insist need don't want to damage the decades long security relationship between the two countries. and that leads us to today. >> and this is the scene today in egypt right now jed protest as you can see are starting to wind down now the court trying morsi haed adjourned for the d. he is going to be moved to a prison in alex andrea until his trial resumes in january. joining me today is the associate professor of middle east policies and the editor of politics in the middle east and movements and change. he joins us from norman, observation oaoklahoma this mor. how will that affect morsi's trial and the relations between the u.s. and egypt. >> it's unlikely the trial will affect the egyptian-u.s. relations. >> the united states values the security element of that relationship more than issues of
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democracysy or human rights or law. unless morsi is found guilty and is charged with such crimes that he would be e executed the trial itself is not going to affect relations it's the again course how politics develops over the next weeks and months. >> then we see secretary kerry traveling to egypt. is he there trying to patch up the contentious relationship with the u.s.? jed i think that i -- i think td analysis. although the military aid has been suspended the united states wants to maintain very strong and serious relations on egypt on the security front and other front. i think that is clearly what he was there doing. >> does the united states have a good choice when it comes to
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citegyptian politics? >> it don't i document doesn't . >> egypt is crew ya crucial fore united states and it provides passage through the suez canal. and intel agains intelligence so on. and the fundment of the relationship is the egyptian-israeli peace deal. the united states is faced with this dilemma how much should it push for human rights and how much shower -- should it push e rule of law. >> without jeopardizing the other tangible agai ben fith. fith -- benefits and the united states chooses security over the prince principles of rule of law and democracy and rule of governance. the associate professor of middle east politics from the university of oklahoma he joined
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us from norman. >> former pakistani president sharif is free on bail. for the latest on that we go to al jazeera wh our corse upon pon c. he is a distraction to the courts there. >> it's a good way to put it. >> some have described the legal legaleelegallegalese a circus. >> the former military ruler of this country has struggled to save himself. he clas has cleared a major hure called the red mosque. it took place in 2007.
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musharraf was leader at that time. the leader at the time musharraf deedecided he wanted to end it d sent in commando's and resulted in well over 100 deaths. the distraction is something that the government doesn't want to see anymore and are looking at ways to allow him to leave the country. >> his bail order says he has could check in with the authoritieauthorities before hee country his lawyer says he is not planning to go anywhere. are there people in pakistan that would prefer that he did leave? to be honest with you i think the vast majority of pakistanis are finisheses with musharraf. which is a stunning change for this country. he ruled this country for nearly a decade.
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he was frankly all powerful and here we are a few years later after he stepped down as president and moved abroad to live in self imposed exile. we see him dragged through the courts that no ruler in pakistan's history has ever seen before. that is also a cause for concern for the military here. it's still ex-treatmently extre. and they are not happy with the way musharraf has been treated as he has, mainly because he has come back on his own advices a . the military would like to see him go and the government would like to see him go and the people would most likely like to see him go as well. >> some people in kosovo say the nations elections have backfired in the north a day after violence errupted in polling
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stations the masked men burst into the polling stations. officals fled and eu police fanned out across the city. kosovo is voting for the first time since need declared independence in 2008. >> a debate over how much power to give military commanders pursuing sexual assault cases. >> two proposals have two continue -- different approaches. >> the problem there are 1600 unsettled sexual assault cases in the armed forces. >> joining us is paula coughlin. if her name sounds familiar she was a key whistle blower during the tail hook scandal. miss cough lynn how do you
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interpret the two different plans being pushed by sen senat? >> well i look at the need for fundmental change and i look a that who supports those two options. and being a former military member and a survivor of sexual assault in the military, and most of the members that i know that are still survivors will fall behind fillbrand's amendment. based on my experience and their experience, we know that the changes that have to come really do need to be from the chain of command. and the military -- right now the department of defense is fighting those two options, fighting the option of removing the chain of command. >> do you feel then that since senator mckaskill is on the other side of this mission you have been betrayed by the
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senator. >> i don't feel i have been betrayed by any of the sen sena. they are wrestling with a emotional issue. >> this is about violent crime and if you want to solve the issue you have to deal with the adjudication process. >> mckaskill has great intentions as does everyone on the armed services knee. knee -- committee. need will not make a change from the violent criminals in our military until need improve the process of investigating and proprosecuting these criminals. mckaskill feels strongly about making positive improvements. i think it's mis misguided. >> let me say this. if senator mcaccoun mckaskill wn
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would he not be just part of the good ol' boy network and doesn't get it. >> in you looif you look at thes there are more men being sexually assaulted in the military than women. it's a violent crime across the board. and the fact that we have two female members duking it out what to do with these criminals is kind of a side bar. >> it's to the benefit of the department of defense and second of defense hagel is i'm sure thrilled to side step this issue and watch two female senators fight it out. the fact remains it's a non-gender issue. >> and fa i if it was a man thad
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i don' want to make these chang. >> i do think there would be more scrutiny. at any level if the american publics is watching senators and discuss and figure out a course of action and that becomes an item of interest, that is to the went fit obenefit of the militae victims that have already come forward. any time this can open up a discussion it's good. >> so you see it as a win-win no matter which way you look at it? >> i see it as moving in the right direction. we just have to keep this issue alive. and we have to keep this issue in the forefront. >> unfortunately i'm going to have to cut you off. because your satellite window is about to expire. that is paula coughlin she joins us from jacksonville, florida this morning. >> a piece of new york is back and returned to rather how old
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cheers. huge crowds seeing a tied race fofor. -- tie tight race-for-the new yk city marathon. two kenyans. >> neeneed comeneed ran with 50r runners. >> stat ostaton island and broon were hard hit by sandy. >> this marathon coming in the wake of the boston marathon bombings last spring. three people were killed and 260 injured in that attack. this year the security was tighter. bag checking, helicopters, bomb
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sniffing dogs. >> overall i think it was a really great way to bring everybody back together. >> the race coordinator say they spent a million dollars keeping people safe. >> emergency on that foot galfootball game. >> eastern tex texans are havina miserable season. the coach fell to his knees and they put him on a stretch your and thank thanks transported his hospital. he is in stable condition and did not suffer a heart attack. no word on what affliction he did sufficient. did -- suffer. >> the texans game out with guns
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blazing and i'm referring to the right around of th -- arm of the quarterback. he finds andre johnson and this time it's 41 td strike and it gives houston a 2 21-3 lead. and the second half the texans show gave way to the colts an andrew luck. this was the td of the second half. colts within five. and luck finds hilton again and this time from nine yards out and three touch downs for the game and the colts rally and beat the texans 27-24. >> the eagles and oakland. flying high. vick would do well to get well soon. foles through seven touch
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dowdgesz tdownsand 406 yards. five different receivers caught passes. >> foles becomes the 7th n.f.l. player to throw 7 touch touchdown passes in a game eagles beat the raiders 49-20. back up quarterback fuels the chiefs. >> third stringer didn't have the tools to keep shawn smith from picking him off at the goal line and running him 100 yardz s from the pick six. and tool was the fourth back up signal caller that the chiefs have faced in five weeks. fourth quarter he serves up a 30th birthday gift and he scores and they go to 9-and-0 for the first time since 2003. >> muchemuch has been made of lf the rise of bullying and harassment in our schools.
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that problem has made it's way into an unexpected place the miami dolphins locker room. johnathan martin is still away after a week after an incident in the dolphin's cafeteria. after accusatoriry statements ss the dolphins have suspended him for conduct unbecoming of the deem. team. >> to the nba russel westbrook was back for the thunder sunday after missing six months with a knee injury against the phoenix suns. westbrook notched 21 points and 7 returns. and oklahoma city defeeted with thcity defeated thesuns 103-96. i saw the kicker trying to make
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the attack. does anyone fear the kicker? >> the kicker are football players too. you have to fear ever everyone e field. >> still ahead we'll have more live from di cairo on the court appearance of morsi. >> and the black tie, celebrating the new film, the documents, one of the world's most renowned leaders nelson mandela.
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>> audiences are intelligent
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welcome back to al jazeera america i'm del walters. >> we are going to tell you about nelson mandela and his trials to adversity. >> but first we are tracking some rain. >> the rain is on the way because of this frontal boundary that is pushing across the majors. plains.
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across the pacific northwest it's all snow. >> beewe have snow falling acros portions of northern idaho. if you are traveling in the passes 3000 feet or above you could see one to three inches of snow. >> we havwe have a winter storm warning in effect and it goes until tomorrow noon. >> we return to our top story the trial of mohamed morsi. they are trying him for insign g murder. sue all calm yet? well it's calm inside of the courthouse. that's over they have post pop d that until january eightth. 8th.
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the pro muslim brotherhood supporters that took to the streets have focused on judicial buildings. >> really trying to show they are not willing to accept the military government that is now in charge here and do not accept this is a legitimate trial. that is what we are hearing inside of the courthouse. >> chaotic scenes inside of that courthouse today. a very short an amount of time e zestsedefendants were inside co. one group was shouting at the judge "down with the military". government and military powers "and another group some female reportsers and otherreports andt permits into the court. and when he was asked he would to the say gil guilty or not gu.
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and he said the judge is just as responsible for the coup. >> he has now been taken to prison up in alexandria. >> a film on the life of nelson mandela, it revived memories of that countries turbulent anti-apartheid history. >> i'm prepared to die. >> long live to freedom had a tough task documenting the life of the most famous anti-apartheid leader. from nelson mandel's days to struggle for equality and it spares no details of his 27 years behind bars. >> which onl
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>> your struggle, and your commitment and your discipline has released me to stand before you today. >> we should remember where we come from. and to this freedom was hard end in that it was one at a very, very heavy place. >> the 35 million-dollar film shows the inner workings of the the mandela family and their struggles. when i watched the film it was an emotional time for me. >> it marks the day that the south africans went to the polls. and mandela was the president of the country that forced him to spend so much time behind bars. >> this they ar story is biggere
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and time itself. >> mandela has not seen the film yet, but his grand daughter thinks the movie will get his seal of approval. >> he is a very humble person and i know that he would really revere the movie. >> movie makers hope he will get to see the finished film eventually. a tribute to his life-long sackrsacksacrifice. >> south africans and millions around the world continue to pray for the health of nelson mandela. that is it for this edition o
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